Washington State – Start Your Business, washington state laws.#Washington #state #laws


Posted On Feb 1 2018 by

START your business

You won’t want to start your business before you have completed your business plan! You may want to click the “Planning” box for business planning guidelines. For planning assistance and more in-depth information regarding any of the steps on this page, you may wish to check out the following resources:

If you are buying a business or even just some of the assets of a business, be aware that you may inadvertently be buying past liabilities in the form of unpaid taxes and experience ratings. Get competent legal advice before purchasing a business because these past liabilities are not necessarily part of the regular financial documents.

  • For potential liabilities related to the Department of Revenue, you should require the owner to provide a Tax Status Letter with regard to any outstanding taxes owned by the business. You may also need to pay Use Tax to the Department of Revenue on the value of tangible assets included in the purchase, such as equipment, furnishings, supplies, etc.
  • For workers’ compensation, the purchaser of a business is liable for premium owed as well as inheriting the claim responsibilities and their impact on future premium rates. Potential purchasers should request claim and safety records listed on this Buyer Beware publication from the seller.
  • For unemployment insurance, you may inadvertently be buying past liabilities and be held accountable for the predecessor’s debt.В

3.В Choose a business structure

A business is a legal entity. It can own property, hold bank accounts and is required to pay taxes. There are different types of business entities, each with unique benefits and limitations.

The “right” choice for you depends on your interests and needs. You’ll need sound counsel to understand your obligations regarding your business. Get to know the business structure options and discuss them with your advisors to determine which will be optimal for you. Find legal, tax and business (SCORE, Small Business Development Centers) advisors. Good decisions are based on:

  • The number of owners now and planned for the future.
  • The types of owners – are they all individuals or are they entities (such as corporations, trusts, etc.)?
  • Liability concerns.
  • Federal tax implications – Internal Revenue Service (IRS).
  • Registration and tax filing requirements and costs.
  • Paperwork and entity management considerations.

Sole Proprietorships are owned by a single person or a married couple. These businesses are inexpensive to form and there are no special reporting requirements. The owner is personally responsible (liable) for all business debts and for federal taxes.

Limited Liability Companies (LLCs) are very popular. The business has limited legal liability like a corporation, but has fewer governance requirements. Creating an LLC requires filing with the Washington Secretary of State. For federal taxes, LLCs are typically treated like sole proprietorships if there is one owner, or like partnerships if there is more than one owner. However, by filing an entity classification election form with the IRS, LLCs can be treated like corporations for federal tax purposes. Although not required, forming an LLC should be done with the help of a qualified legal professional. Among other requirements, LLCs are required to create a governance document called an Operating Agreement.

General Partnerships are like sole proprietorships with more than one owner. Partners share managerial duties, profits and losses, and each is personally responsible (liable) for all business debt. Because the actions of one partner can result in personal liability for the others, partnerships have become less popular since LLCs have been around. For federal tax purposes, the business is required to file a partnership return, with the income or loss going to each partner based on how much of the business each owns.

Corporations are more complex structures than the others. As with LLCs, corporations have limited legal liability. To form a corporation, you must file with the Washington Secretary of State and you must create a governance document—which, in this case, would be bylaws. Corporations also have other requirements, such as issuing stock certificates, holding annual meetings and keeping minutes, electing directors, etc. Working owners of corporations are employees and must have federal payroll taxes withheld and reported the same as other employees. Corporations file federal corporate tax returns with the IRS. If qualified and applied for on a timely basis, corporations may choose pass-through taxation, where income taxes are paid by the owner(s) but not also by the corporation (“S-Corporation”). Although not required, forming a corporation should be done with the assistance of a qualified legal professional.

Limited Partnerships (LPs) are not used very often for small businesses, although they are common for real estate ownership. LPs are composed of one or more general partners and one or more limited partners. The general partners manage the entity and share fully in its profits and losses. To protect themselves from liability, general partners are often corporations or LLCs rather than individuals. Limited partners share in the profits of the business, but their losses are limited to the extent of their investment. Limited partners are usually not involved in the day-to-day operations of the entity. Get legal advice before choosing an LP structure for your business. Like LLCs and corporations, creating an LP requires filing with the Washington Secretary of State.

Washington State Business and Organization Structure Considerations:





Last Updated on: February 1st, 2018 at 4:46 am, by


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